Category Archives: Recipes

Ebelskivers…

Greetings my few readers (looking at you David McC and Tabitha).

So as there was a slight request for me to continue blogging, here is a bit of toe dip into that. This morning I felt the need to make Ebelskivers…do you know these delicious Danish pancakes?!?! I love them, but am likely the worst flipper in history. (Though I secretly suspect the only people ACTUALLY good at flipping them are cooks in Danish bed and breakfasts.)

Breakfast! Ebelskivers with Lingonberry Jam and fruit salad

Anyway Ebelskivers are a round pancake with lingonberry jam in the middle. Very YUMMY! You have to make them in a special pan mine looks like this:

ebelskiver-pan

Cast iron Ebelskiver pan

 

Anywhoodle, I followed a recipe, which I will link to here, but here are the basic steps:

  1. Make a pancake like batter (including whipped egg whites folded in)
  2. Melt butter into each pan pocket
  3. Add some batter
  4. Add some jam
  5. Add some batter, let it cook
  6. Attempt and fail at ninja flipping the dough
  7. Readjust it so it looks somewhat presentable
  8. Let cook, then remove…

That’s it. The hardest part by far is flipping the dough, though patiently whipping the egg whites is somewhat difficult too…

Here is the recipe I followed…

If you try it, let me know how it works. If you’re local and want to borrow my pan, that works too.

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Roasted Garlic

So if you haven’t experienced roasted garlic before, I am sooo sorry you’ve been seriously missing out! Roasting garlic is a) super easy and b) insanely delicious. So the basics…. Garlic heads are roasted in olive oil until they are squishy deliciousness. There are “garlic roasters” which are terra cotta dishes that are similar (read: identical) to the terra cotta dishes that you might keep warmed corn tortillas in. These speciality dishes are not necessary but are super nice to have. They should under NO circumstances be purchased at retail prices as visiting around three thrift shops should net you a nice cheap one!

Here’s what you’re looking for:

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(Actually now that I am looking at it mine is probably a tortilla one, garlic ones sometimes have garlic heads on the handle and might be smaller, but seriously they are completely interchangeable!)

So anyway you take the garlic head and cut off the top exposing most of the tops of the cloves (this allows them to expand once they are done/gets all the juicy goodness everywhere). Then you set the heads in the pan (I imagine any covered roasting dish will work fine) and pour olive oil over them. Be liberal coating each head, then place it in the oven at around 400 for about an hour. About half an hour in the scent will start driving you crazy.

They are flexible with temperature so if you are roasting/cooking other things just let it cook at that temp but check it’s progress. This is what it looks like when done.

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You can serve them whole and each person can just dig out their own, be sure to have extra paper napkins as even with knives this is messy!! If you have roasted garlic lovers and are serving French bread plan on 1 per person. But it also stores and freezes well, so I usually do about 4. I noticed recently that WinCo sells roasted garlic in the fresh herb section, not remembering the price, but am sure it was ridiculous. Garlic heads are usually .38 if bought individually so one is less than .50 of deliciousness!

Some possible uses:
– served as is with French bread.
– served with goat cheese spread on bread or other canapé.
– add to mashed potatoes
– in hummus
– added to baguette/boule dough (chop and add it with the dry ingredients- honestly since my twin converted me to this I doubt I will ever make plain French breads. Kalah adds it to her boule loaves and makes grilled sandwiches– AMAZING!)
– mixed with cream cheese as a spread on a sandwich
– anything else you could think of…

If you’ve never tried making this before and give it a shot I would love to hear how it goes!!

Guten Appetit!!

Frugal Friday- Granola

gra·no·la
grəˈnōlə/
noun
  1. a kind of breakfast cereal consisting typically of rolled oats, brown sugar or honey, dried fruit, and nuts.

So last night I was pondering what to feature for today’s Frugal Friday. Thankfully I was pondering this while stirring a small batch of granola so viola, the answer came to me!

If you are a fan of granola I really hope you’ve already tried making it. If you are a fan of Trader Joe’s and buy theirs…shame on you! It is is a super delicious, easy and inexpensive thing to make. I whipped up a small batch last night while I was cooking dinner, and it was so good we kept picking at it long past dessert. In fact I had a breakfast meeting this morning with an amazing spread, and I missed out on all of it because I was full of granola!

Bowl of golden granola

 

Granola, and muesli (the unbaked granola) are very versatile, and frankly full of whatever your heart desires. In this case since I don’t eat it daily and I love the rich color and tastiness, I include a touch more than a wee bit of butter and sugars 🙂

What I used: (these are good amounts for one or two people)

  • 4 cups oats
  • 1/3 cup sliced almonds
  • 1/3 cup cashew pieces
  • 1/2 c brown sugar
  • 1 cube and 1/2 cube of butter
  • 1/3 cup honey

 

What I did:

  1. Preheat oven to 325F, when you’re done mixing it should be ready
  2. Melt the butter in the microwave
  3. Add oats, nuts, and sugar to a big bowl, mix it all up
  4. Add honey to the melted butter and mix
  5. Add the liquid gold to the bowl of goodies and stir it all up until everything is coated
  6. Bake for 30 minutes, stirring ever 7-10 minutes.
  7. Allow to cool on wax paper (otherwise it will stick to your pan)
  8. Once cool, store in cereal container or ziplock, and enjoy!

 

Guten Appetit!

 

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Potatoes Au Gratin

Since I already discussed a bit about using a roux to make a cream sauce on Friday, I thought I would riff on that theme today with one of my all time favorite things to eat. Like in the history of mankind!

Potatoes Au Gratin (with kielbasa in this case.)

I know I have covered Potatoes Au Gratin in the past, but I am a tinkerer by nature, especially of foods I LOVE, and I have tinkered with this one quite a bit. Anyway, I have worked on getting a creamier consistency through using a cheese sauce. And since it will be super simple given last week’s discussion of Chicken Alfredo thought I would put it in here.

Potatoes Au Gratin

 

So basically the first step to any Potatoes Au Gratin is thinly sliced potatoes. If you don’t have a mandolin to make thin slices, you can usually pick one up at a Ross or HomeGoods or other discount store for under $10. Or just slice as thin and as consistently as you can. To make this size of a dish I would usually use a 3 medium potatoes, they stretch out much more than you would imagine since you basically thinly layer them. I recommend just slicing up how much you want, and then finding a dish to fit it in.

What I used: (no amounts today as I made this a while ago, and can’t remember. Sorry Megan.)

  • Potatoes, thinly sliced
  • Tillamook Cheddar, shredded
  • butter
  • rice flour
  • milk
  • salt and pepper
  • Beef Kielbasa (to make it a main instead of a side)

 

What I did:

  1. Turn oven on to 400F.
  2. Grease the pan you will bake it in, it is far better to go too big than too small, extra room on top will not hurt it. Mine in the pic above was a bit close to the top.
  3. Put a layer of potatoes into the dish, VERY lightly salt and pepper (it adds up!)
  4. Add sliced up kielbasa across the top (not necessarily a full layer)
  5. Sprinkle on a handful of cheese.
  6. Repeat 3, 4, and 5.
  7. Repeat 3.
  8. Now make the cheese sauce:
    1. Make a roux of butter and rice flour (this will make it GF)
    2. Slowly add milk whisking as it thickens.
    3. Make it thinner than a typical sauce, and add a handful or two of cheese, which will further thicken it up. You don’t want it too think as you want it to run in between everything.
  9. Pour the cheese sauce over the potatoes, trying to get it distributed throughout the dish.
  10. Add some more cheese to the top and bake it for about an hour or so. (Check at 40m and 50m)
  11. Should be browned on top and nice and bubbly.
  12. Let it sit for a few minutes to set up, or all the deliciousness will run all over your plate.

Guten Appetit!

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Curried Chicken Salad

Tonight’s dinner is brought to you by the theme: What’s fast and uses up things I need to get rid of?

About seven minutes before I took this picture I asked my husband if he wanted some dinner- if you have met David you can anticipate his response was a yes…so looking in the fridge, what did I need to use up? There was leftover chicken from Roast Chicken, greek yogurt that Jeffrey and Libby left behind, and some apples that I dropped leaving the store (expediting their use-by date.) So I landed on a super simple: Curried Chicken Salad.
(Editer’s Note: Having made this before with mayo instead of greek yogurt, we definitely prefer the taste of the mayo one, greek yogurt may require additional seasonings.)

 

curried chicken salad on a bed of lettuce in a red bowlYeah, I know, my phone camera isn’t awesome at color and texture depth.

What I used:

  • leftover chicken
  • celery
  • half an appe
  • a bit of greek yogurt
  • some curry powder
  • romaine

How I did it:

  1. chop the romaine and set aside (any greens will do of course)
  2. chop up the chicken, celery, apple (also awesome with grapes, but I didn’t have any)
  3. put all but lettuce in a mixing bowl
  4. add greek yogurt (not too dry, not too overloaded)
  5. add curry powder to taste
  6. adjust with S&P
  7. serve over lettuce
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Roast Chicken and Potatoes au Gratin

au grat·in

/ˌō ˈgrätn/
Adjective-
Sprinkled with breadcrumbs or grated cheese or both, and browned. 

Continuing the theme of comfort food that has gone with this week’s wonderfully dry cold snap, here is a basic roasted chicken, which I served with potatoes au gratin. Below I will give descriptions of what I did, keeping it ridiculously simple on the chicken, but both dishes really. If you want an expert recipe, versions of both can be found in Julia Child’s classic cookbook. Consult for an expert opinion…

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Not exactly a well rounded meal, but delicious!

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The Potatoes au gratin got nice and browned

What I used:

  • whole chicken
  • butter
  • salt and pepper
  • 2 potatoes
  • gruyere cheese (any will do)*
  • milk

What I did (Chicken):

  1. removed the innards
  2. patted it dry
  3. rubbed it down with softened butter (inside and out)
  4. salt and peppered (inside and out)
  5. Put in the oven at 425 for 15-20 minutes, rotating and browning
  6. roast at 350 until done (check at an hour or so)

What I did (Potatoes):

  1. peel potatoes
  2. slice really thin (I used a cheap mandolin for this)
  3. butter a shallow baking dish
  4. rinse and pat dry potatoes (take off some of the starch)
  5. put half the potatoes on the bottom of the dish
  6. add salt and pepper
  7. add small dots of butter
  8. add shredded cheese
  9. put the other half of the potatoes on
  10. repeat 6, 7, 8
  11. bake at 425 until done (or bake it with the chicken at 350, and when you take the chicken out (and tent it to rest) turn the heat up and move it to the top shelf to brown.)

*For the cost conscious this is a great meal. The chicken was around $4, and the total of the rest (minus cheese) less then a dollar. Using an inexpensive cheddar instead of gruyere would make the whole meal less then $6.
^ Definitions from dictionary.com

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Recovery Soup

Having had a stomach bug the last few days, I have been keeping my food options pretty boring. Fortunately the husband is not ill, so I had to think of something bland and boring that could easily be transformed into something enjoyable to the normal person as well. Here is what I came up with, an Asian inspired chicken noodle soup

20130102-184728.jpgMy bland and boring soup

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David’s less boring soup

What I used:

  • dried asian noodles
  • chicken broth
  • chicken breast
  • seasonings
  • soy sauce
  • fresh ginger
  • spinach
  • mushroom
  • hot oil
  • sesame oil

What I did for the bland soup:

  1. sautéd diced chicken in soy sauce*
  2. season as it cooks
  3. meanwhile heat broth in a saucepan*
  4. add dried noodles cooking to soft
  5. add several slices of ginger*
  6. simmer until chicken is cooked
  7. add chicken and serve….

What I did next for the good stuff:

  1. sautéd sliced mushrooms
  2. wilt spinach in
  3. pour bland soup into bowl
  4. add a dash of sesame oil
  5. add appropriate amount of hot oil dashes (D took 6)
  6. add mushrooms and spinach and serve

* cooked chicken, noodles, broth, ginger and soy sauce all are recommended for eating when your stomach is recovering.

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Cassoulet

cas·sou·let
/ˌkasəˈlā/
Noun
A stew made with meat and beans.

The other night I wanted to make a bit of old-school comfort food. Combining that with the chicken drumsticks I had thawed out, and some sausage that our friends had left in the fridge I decided to make a cassoulet. While I am no French trained chef, I feel free to call this a cassoulet as it is in fact a stew of meat and beans. 🙂

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What I used:

  • four chicken drumsticks
  • half a sausage
  • a shallot, sub diced onions if you prefer
  • two carrots in pieces
  • two celery stalks in pieces
  • fresh thyme
  • a little white wine
  • some chicken broth
  • two cans of cannellini beans

What I did:

  1. browned the chicken pieces in a little olive oil in a dutch oven
  2. removed the chicken to a side dish
  3. lightly brown sliced shallot
  4. add and slightly cook celery and carrot
  5. add salt, pepper and a bit of thyme
  6. add slices of sausage
  7. add some wine and let it cook off the alcohol
  8. add cans of cannellini beans
  9. add a cup of broth
  10. put the chicken back in
  11. simmer on the stove until the chicken is fully cooked (can cook it until the meat falls off the bone if you like)
  12. add a wee bit of cornstarch mixed with cold water if you want to thicken the sauce up

Fantastic served with wine and crusty bread. I never do it, but in theory, might be nice with a salad.

* To make this even easier/faster, you could use other chicken, either cooked up already, or boneless diced chicken breasts. Though the longer stewing time does allow the flavors to mingle better.

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